On Leave

A number of our esteemed faculty are taking a break from the rigors of teaching and administration so they can focus on their work. In this post, we highlight the goings-on of Hajime Hoji and Khalil Iskarous.

Hajime Hoji

Hajime was at Yokohama, Japan, in September, where he participated in a small workshop on Language Faculty Science. He also gave a talk titled “Language Faculty Science as an Exact Science: An Illustration based on Experimental Considerations” at Kanagawa University, on the 11th of that month.

In February-May of 2015, he will be visiting Kyoto University, Japan, to disseminate the idea of Language Faculty Science in Japan.

In the meantime, his book “Language Faculty Science” is closer and closer to being fully cooked and taken out of the oven for everyone to enjoy! He also intends to write “Introduction to Language Faculty Science” as an experimental follow-up for the former book. If anyone is interested in the content of his book, the “Remarks” board under “Discussion” at his homepage (http://www.gges.org/hoji/) contains some info about it.

Khalil Iskarous

Khalil is taking the traditional fourth-year leave that comes in the middle of the USC’s six-year tenure process. The point of this leave is to prepare the dossier for tenure; for Khalil, this neatly coincides with the third year of his NSF grant, which is the year when most writing gets done.

This summer, Khalil and his team took a cinematic trip to Japan, where they collected video footage of octopodes. Khalil hopes that the movement of octopus tentacles (and other octopus behavior) will give us insight about the reciprocal relationship between biomechanics and phonological tasks–and so far, the results are quite promising.

Email Khalil if you’d like to hear more about his work. Ask to see an octopus video; those little guys are incredible.

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